Gang Roundup – September 2016

Gang Roundup - September 2016 - What's happening around the net involving dieselpunk, 1920s and noir

A few months ago I noticed a post on the blog of fellow writers Sue Coletta: Sharing the Love in the Writing Community where she shares news about fellow writers. I love the idea of sharing what other writers and bloggers do and if you follow me on my social media you have probably stumbled upon my sharings. But I like the idea of sharing on this blog too.

On social media, I share anything from writing tips, marketing tools and experience, book reviews, photos, video, funny animal pics (especially kitties – yes, I’m one of those people), industry news, quotes.
But don’t worry, I’m not going to inundate you with all kinds of stuff. On this blog, I’d like to share especially about the diesel ear – particularly the 1920s, of course – and dieselpunk. There is some awesome material out there and I can’t wait to share it with you.

Ready? Here it goes the first Gang Roundup.

 

Ludgate Circus, London, November 192240 Amazing Vintage Photographs That Capture Everyday Life in London during the 1920s

The Vintage Everyday Blog is one of my favourite places in the blogosphere and I’m sure I’ll share a lot of posts from here. They publish vintage photos of every kind, from many different eras. Sometimes fun stuff, sometimes everyday stuff, sometimes even quite creepy stuff.
The everyday photos are my absolute favorite. Here is a fat collection of photos from 1920s London. Quite a charming place, don’t you think?

 

ice box

Refrigerators or Ice Boxes?

Mary Miley is a writers of mysteries set in Silent Era Hollywood. On her blog, she shares information about 1920s everyday life.
The 1920s were an exciting time for everything concerning the house. Many things that we take for granted now first appeared in the 1920s and either became commonplace or took the first steps to becoming commonplace later on. Refrigerators? Yes, they were among those things.

“Iceboxes had been around for decades before the 1920s and were common in middle-class homes. These were, literally, boxes with a bottom door (or two or more) for food and a top compartment lined with tin for the block of ice.”

 

 

DDP_Podcast_Logo

The Diesel Powered Podcast #55 – Dieselpunk in Pop Culture Roundtable

The Diesel Powered Podcast is one of the best places where to start getting an idea what Dieselpunk is. It certainly was an eye-opener for me. Larry Hamyett, who’s one of the dieselpunk community most influential members, is often a guest.
In this episode in particular, he and Johnny Della Rocca talk about the basic of dieselpunk, what is it and what are its defining element.

 

 

wood-alcohol-warningCoroner’s Cocktails and Yak Yak Bourbon: The Worst Drinks of Prohibition

Fellow writer and blogger Lupachi writes dieselpunk stories set in Chicago in the 1920s, so I suppose it was only a matter of time before we met. On her blog she shares information about the 1920s and especially about Chicago and Al Capone, with extremely well researched articles.
This blog is part of her continuing series about the history of the most popular Prohibition cocktails

 

 

speak-easyCatherynne M. Valente – Speak Easy

“The hotel Artemisia sits on a fantastical 72nd Street, in a decade that never was. It is home to a cast of characters, creatures, and creations unlike any other, including especially Zelda Fair, who is perfect at being Zelda, but who longs for something more. The world of this extraordinary novella—a bootlegger’s brew of fairy tales, Jazz Age opulence, and organized crime—is ruled over by the diminutive, eternal, sinister Al. Zelda holds her own against the boss, or so it seems. But when she faces off against him and his besotted employee Frankie in a deadly game that just might change everything, she must bet it all and hope not to lose…”

This is a in-depth review of what sounds like a very different book, inspired by Zelda Fitzgerald’s life.
I haven’t read the book yet, so I can’t speak my mind on it… but yes, I’ve bought it.

 

 

airship over new york cityThe Wonderful Machine Age: The Daring Young Men in Their Flying Machines

You may remember C W Hawes, since he’s been a guest on this blog with a post about his favourite subject: airship. CW is the most knowledgeable person I know about this subject and let me tell you I’d read about it for hours.
He dedicated a few series to the airships on his blog. This one it the first I read and truly enjoyed. You can read the entire series here:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

 

 

Sarah Plugs Her Own Stuff

Yeah, well, while we’re at it, let me plug my work too. I’d like to share with you my book reviews. You might happen to have a couple of minutes to check them out

26 June 2016 – The Most Sublime Blog
28 June 2016 – Terry Tyler Book Reviews
1 September 1026 – History from a Woman’s Perspective: A Book Blog

FREE EBOOK - The Roaring Twenties A to Z

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About the Author

jazzfeathers
I was born, raised and I still live near Verona (Italy), though I worked for a time in Dublin. I started writing fantasy stories as a kid. Today I’m a bookseller who reads fantasy, history, mythology, anthropology and lots of speculative fiction. Somehow, all of this has found its way into my own dieselpunk stories.

7 Comments on "Gang Roundup – September 2016"

  1. What a fabulous post, Sarah! I have lots of new sites to check out! And thanks for the plug!

  2. Seems like there are blogs, blog posts, and web sites that cover just about anything you can think of. The internet is a great place to find information on just about anything we want to know.

    Arlee Bird
    Arlee Bird recently posted…What Is Your Favorite Kind of Music? (Question of the Month)My Profile

  3. Very interesting! I had heard of steampunk but wasnt aware of dieselpunk. Nor did I realise there was so much of it out there.
    Ali Isaac recently posted…Tree Lore | The RowanMy Profile

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