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Holocaust Remembrance Day 2015

7 Comments

  • Crispian Thurlborn
    Posted January 27, 2015 at 10:32

    “First they came for the Jews
    and I did not speak out
    because I was not a Jew.

    Then they came for the Communists
    and I did not speak out
    because I was not a Communist.

    Then they came for the trade unionists
    and I did not speak out
    because I was not a trade unionist.

    Then they came for me
    and there was no one left
    to speak out for me.”

    – “First They Came for the Jews”, Martin Niemöller (1892-1984)

  • Sue Coletta
    Posted January 27, 2015 at 11:55

    What a haunting image.

  • Post Author
    jazzfeathers
    Posted January 27, 2015 at 11:01

    Thanks, Crispian.

  • Lene Fogelberg
    Posted January 27, 2015 at 14:12

    Love it. So important these days.

  • Post Author
    jazzfeathers
    Posted January 27, 2015 at 16:47

    I think it is extremely important to remember and to pass on the memory, so that we might not do the same horrible deeds again.

    My sister visited the Risara di San Sabba, which was the only extermination camp in Italy (there were several concentration camps, but this was the only one with operating furnaces). She said there’s almost nothing now at the site, only the main building and only one reconstructed cell inside, with very little furniture. But you have to walk down a corridor lined by two very high walls to get inside. The walls are not original but rebuilt, and still she said it gave her a sense of desperation, knowing that people really walked that corridor and never came back. In the courtyard, the furnace has been long since demolished, but on the ground a path has been drawn that follows the underground pipes bringing gas to the furnace. She said that was what shocked her the most. Seeing that path.

    In one of the central plaza in Verona, my city, there’s a wagon on display these days. It’s one of the wagons that brought people to different concentration camps. There’s a recorded voice inside calling all the names of people from my city who were deported. Some of that people were from my same town.
    It gives me chills. Sometimes, you can hear six, seven people with the same family names being called.
    It is disturbing. It is chilly. But I think it’s right to do it. This is history and it isn’t a pleasant part of history.

  • Susan Gourley
    Posted January 27, 2015 at 22:33

    I taught for years with a survivor of the death camps. Her story was incredible and horrifying. Let us never forget though some seem to already.

  • Post Author
    jazzfeathers
    Posted January 28, 2015 at 05:33

    Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Susan.

    I think having the possibility to receive the story and experience of these people is a rare gift. We should truely treasure it.

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